Why The Republican Party Must Re-Brand Itself

Why The Republican Party Must Re-Brand Itself

The Republican Party is in turmoil, without doubt about any of it. White males in suburban and rural areas, their core base, are fed up with Government and want an “outsider”, even Donald Trump. Meanwhile young voters love Bernie, and women and minorities support Hillary, despite questionable trust in her. The Republican establishment is bewildered because their traditional message no longer resonates with the majority of their constituents. In short, the world has turned upside down for them. And these dynamics are not so different from the constant changes in the marketplace that force companies to sometimes re-position their brands.

You can find clear signs that the Republican Party has lost its way. In a CNN/ORC poll in March, only 10% of Americans have a lot of confidence in the G.O.P providing real leadership for the country. The perception of Congress, controlled by Republicans, is simply as bad – only 15% approval rating, down 6 points from February.

The branding challenges facing the Republican Party are significant, and in addition can provide a useful lesson for businesses if they experience market changes that affect their brand image:

THE CLIENT (i.e. Voters) – there is nothing more important in branding than constantly monitoring the mark audience and their evolving passions, and being able to adapt accordingly. Older white males with less education and income, a primary target for Republicans, have grown impatient with promises of higher income and better jobs. They identify the Republican elite with big business and the wealthy, the “donor class”. Certainly the Citizens United case fueling the energy of super PACs and the influence of wealthy donors has contributed to this disenchantment, leaving these downscale voters with the impression they no more have a voice. While many of these voters drifted to the Republican Party between 2008 and 2012 because of the frustration with Obama, they’re now very skeptical and see Washington dominated by lobbyists, contractors and lawmakers who have ignored these voters’ growing anguish.

Meanwhile the profile of American voters is changing dramatically. The Millennials have become the largest voting bloc and are gravitating to Bernie Sanders with his idealistic promises, which have become not the same as the mandate of Republicans. Even younger Republicans aren’t in sync with issues like immigration; for example, 63% said they supported giving immigrants a chance to become citizens (source: poll in March by Public Religion Research Institute). Furthermore the voting power of minority segments is growing rapidly, with their frustrations with the Republican brand. The “Tea Party” conservatives may be the most passionate and outspoken, but their views are seen by many as too extreme and there are not enough of these to win the main Republican goal, the White House.

Running a business, the emotions and desires of a brand’s target customers, plus its profile mix, are always in circumstances of flux, as well. Smart companies understand how important it is to recognize emerging trends and the evolving needs of their customers, and will re-position their brands with modified promises and/or new features to sustain their emotional bond with them.

Competition – The race for the Republican nomination has attracted entirely new and different candidates with strong views outside its traditional mantra of values and brand positioning (i.e. “outsiders” like Trump and Cruz). Trump’s belligerent propositions, while they may interest heretofore loyal Republicans (e.g. white males, less educated) who today have dubious perceptions of Congress and Republican leadership, are clearly not in line with the views of the Republican elite. sneak a peek on this website Cruz has galvanized the extreme right, but his brand image is hostile rather than consistent with the old Republican persona. Running a business, when new competitors arrive, savvy companies will assess which competitive brand promises are so appealing, and just why, and either revise their brand positioning to resonate more (rationally and emotionally), and/or create new offers to convince customers that their basic promises still represent less expensive.

Brand Promise or Message – there’s definitely a glaring disconnect between the traditional views of the Republican Party and the attitudes of these standard voter base, especially on an emotional level. The embarrassing lack of trust of the Republican controlled congress (only 41% of Americans trust Government today) and the perception of its elitist leadership being out of touch, have fueled the anger and frustration of all voters. More important, it has also undermined the relevance of its mainstream brand promises. As running a business, the key is to re-evaluate their customers and revise the brand message to emotionally interact with their passions, and to appeal to emerging segments offering greater potential for achieving their strategic goals.